Skip to Content


Home > Culture > Books on Venice

Books on Venice

Categories

Links

Dream of Venice

Rating:
(1 votes)
Beautiful coffee table book with inspiring photos and quotes.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

La Serenissima ~ a story of Love

Rating:
(6 votes)
La Serenissima ~ a story of Love This is a tale of passionate love, not only between a man and a woman but for the captivating city of Venice, otherwise known as La Serenissima. Tracy-ann Martin's debut novel plunges us into a cauldron of spiritual warfare, it's heroine caught up in a 600-year-old prophecy which pitches the defenders of Venice against cruel and relentless forces of evil, intent on destroying it. What begins as an innocent family holiday is soon transformed into an intense struggle for the very survival of this ancient city on its atmospheric lagoon. Here an ordinary woman finds her true destiny, aided by souls who rise from their watery graves to defend the island. will the virtues of love and laughter be strong enough to prevail?

Read 4 Reviews Comment Bookmark It More Details

Venice by Jan Morris

Rating:
(1 votes)
'One of the most diverse and diverting books ever written about Venice . . . A taut and personal report, wholly absorbing, quickened by vivid prose and astringent humour.' Sunday Times.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

Venice Pure City by Peter Ackroyd

Rating:
(1 votes)
'Ackroyd writes beguilingly as he weaves his way around the lagoon, supplying interesting details en route...' --The Times.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

Miss Garnet's Angel by Salley Vickers

Rating:
(2 votes)
A story about a retired teacher who spends the winter in Venice.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

City of Falling Angels by John Berendt

Rating:
(2 votes)
"Taking the fire that destroyed the Fenice theatre in 1996 as his starting point, John Berendt creates a unique and unforgettable portrait of Venice and its extraordinary inhabitants. Beneath the exquisite facade of the world's most beautiful historic city, scandal, corruption and venality are rampant, and John Berendt is a master at seeking them out. Ezra Pound and his mistress, Olga; poet Mario Stefani; the Rat Man of Treviso; or Mario Moro - self-styled carabiniere, fireman, soldier or airman, depending on the day of the week." (Amazon).

Read 1 Review Comment Bookmark It More Details

City of Fortune: How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire by Roger Crowley

Rating:
(0 votes)
'Roger Crowley makes a trustworthy and wonderfully eloquent guide ... Crowley is such a natural narrative historian, with such an eye for colourful but telling details and such a knack for dramatic character sketches, that he remains a constant joy to read.' --Christopher Hart, Sunday Times.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

A Beast in Venice by Michael E. Henderson

Rating:
(0 votes)
While strolling the misty streets of his beloved Venice in search of a good martini, middle-aged ex-lawyer-turned-artist Brigham Stone sees a man walk through a brick wall. His wife, Rose, blames the booze (doesn't she always?), but his gondolier friend, Mauro, is convinced ghoulish creatures known as “shroud eaters” have returned to Venice after a centuries-long absence.

Website Comment Bookmark It More Details

Carnival for the Dead: A Venetian Mystery by David Hewson

Rating:
(0 votes)
'In Carnival of the Dead, David Hewson conveys well the atmosphere of Venice and its bewildering maze of alleys between canals. He also recounts aspects of Venetian history with verve. He captures the changing light of Venice, which his heroine Teresa Lupo sees as Turner-esque, and he describes the paintings in churches and galleries with close attention to their details...Hewson nudges on the plot as it twists and turns with incidental characters and episodes. The story is exciting.'
--Sarah Curtis, TLS.

Website Comment Bookmark It More Details

Carrying off the Palaces: John Ruskin's Lost Daguerreotypes

Rating:
(0 votes)
In 2006 the photographic historians Ken and Jenny Jacobson bought an unprepossessing lot at an auction in Penrith, listed in the catalogue as a mahogany box containing 19th-century photographs of buildings and stonewark (sic). Their hunch that it might be the treasure for which they had been searching was triumphantly justified ... More info

Comment Bookmark It More Details

Death in Venice by Thomas Mann

www.amazon.co.uk

Rating:
(0 votes)
Gustav von Aschenbach, a successful ageing writer, travels to Venice for a holiday. One day, at dinner in his hotel, Aschenbach notices an exceptionally beautiful young boy. Soon his days begin to revolve around seeing this boy and he is too distracted to pay attention to the ominous rumours that have begun to circulate about disease spreading through the city.

Website Comment Bookmark It More Details

Dream of Venice - Architecture

Rating:
(0 votes)
The second book in the Dream of Venice series.

See this blog post for more information.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

In Venice and in the Veneto with Lord Byron by Gregory Dowling

Rating:
(0 votes)
No information on Amazon - anyone read it? Please leave a review.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

Othello by William Shakespeare

Rating:
(0 votes)
The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice is one of Shakespeare's tragedies.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

Rating:
(0 votes)
One of Shakespeare's most famous plays. You can read the whole play here.

Comment Bookmark It More Details

The Passion by Jeanette Winterson

Rating:
(0 votes)
The Passion is perhaps her most highly acclaimed work, a modern classic that confirms her special claim on the novel. Set during the tumultuous years of the Napoleonic Wars, The Passion intertwines the destinies of two remarkable people: Henri, a simple French soldier, who follows Napoleon from glory to Russian ruin; and Villanelle, the red-haired, web-footed daughter of a Venetian boatman, whose husband has gambled away her heart. In Venice's compound of carnival, chance, and darkness, the pair meet their singular destiny. (Publisher's blurb).

Comment Bookmark It More Details

The Unfinished Palazzo: Life, Love and Art in Venice by Judith Mackrell

Rating:
(0 votes)
Read the Guardian's review
The story of Venice’s “Unfinished Palazzo”― told through the lives of three of its most unconventional, passionate, and fascinating residents: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim

Comment Bookmark It More Details

Add A Link





Have a question or comment?
comments powered by Disqus


© 2008 - 2018 VeniceEmpire. Terms of Use